Valerie Chiang


This is my photography and personal blog.
Instagram: @ninebagatelles
benefitdirt asked: Wait. I've watched I Ship It multiple times and I was wondering, is that you behind the stuffed rabbit in the Ex Box Craigslist scenes?

yulinkuang:

No, that’s my friend Valerie Chiang (ninebagatelles on Tumblr) who is also a gorgeous photographer, check out her blog for more of her work! She also took some behind-the-scenes photos for I Ship It, which you can see on my Facebook page.

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Haha yup, I was in about 2 seconds of my friend Yulin Kuang’s film I Ship It. Check it out — it’s super fun and Yulin worked so hard on this!!! #proud

Fox Restaurant Concepts (Corporation, USA)

whopaysphotogs:

$2500 + $400 for every large reprint (Portrait Stock sale, 2014)

Retained full copyright.

Fox Restaurant Concepts (creates and manages boutique-style restaurants) paid to license one photograph of mine to print as a mural on one of their restaurant’s walls and for use online/promoting. Immediate payment after I Dropboxed my images to them. Wonderful company.

Another one of my submissions. Reblogging as another PSA: if you’re a photog, you should follow this blog!! It really opens your eyes to how photographers are paid nowadays.

Judith Joy Ross
"When I shoot, I am photographing because what is in front of me is really happening and I want people to know about it. I fall in love with the beauty of an expression, or turn of a collar, a poignant gesture, the light. I don’t know these people except suddenly with a camera we have an intense relationship… the picture is proof. Its about paying attention. I have a large beautiful wooden camera. I am a quick talker, I can convince people in a few seconds because I am sincerely interested in them, but I am really interested more in capturing what I see in them. It’s not that I want to be their friend, it’s that I see their life and it is amazing and I want to put it in an image. It’s a short but deep connection."

Judith Joy Ross

"When I shoot, I am photographing because what is in front of me is really happening and I want people to know about it. I fall in love with the beauty of an expression, or turn of a collar, a poignant gesture, the light. I don’t know these people except suddenly with a camera we have an intense relationship… the picture is proof. Its about paying attention. I have a large beautiful wooden camera. I am a quick talker, I can convince people in a few seconds because I am sincerely interested in them, but I am really interested more in capturing what I see in them. It’s not that I want to be their friend, it’s that I see their life and it is amazing and I want to put it in an image. It’s a short but deep connection."

Photographs by Julien Magre

Land of Nod (part of Crate & Barrel, USA)

whopaysphotogs:

$600 per image for 3 Landscape images, $1800 total. Stock sale (2014)

Full copyright retained of photographs.

No travel expenses covered (they asked me to go out and shoot for them) but I charged them an extra $50 editing fee for one image and was paid without any question.

These images were made into 100 12”x12” prints for each photograph and sold in the company’s decor section. Great communication, prompt payment, nice people to deal with. A good experience overall!

Speed of payment - 2 weeks or less

Editor Note - original submission does not specify if this was just one print run. Either way, at 6 USD/print for the artist, this seems like a poor deal.

First of all, if you are working photographer, you should follow this blog. It’s a submission-based collection of companies, magazines, newspaper, etc… who pay (or don’t pay) photographers for their images, with each person who submits giving specific details of the transaction.

This was one of my submissions. In response to the “editor note” above, the only reason I agreed to this deal (because I agree, $6 per print is a very poor deal) is because the images they bought from me are not part of my portfolio/photographs I worked extensively on. They were just some photos I took while traveling, so they a) are not personal to me and b) I did not spend extra time to take them.

But the important thing is that they were honest in dealing with me and my work, they pay promptly, and there was mutual respect.

theconceptsofcolor:

Alec Soth 
Sleeping by the Mississippi, 2013

"I fell in love with the process of taking pictures, with wandering around finding things. To me it feels like a kind of performance. The picture is a document of that performance. But what function does that serve? This is the problem with work like mine, that is more lyrical than documentary. Like poetry itself, it is pretty much useless. What really frustrates me is that photography is not very good at telling stories. Stories are so satisfying. Novels and movies satisfy, but photographs often leave me feel like something is missing."

Alec Soth, from his interview with Aaron Schuman

Hero (2002)
dir. Zhang Yimou

This sequence from Hero is one of, in my opinion, the most breathtaking in all of cinema. I watched this movie in theaters when I was ten years old and hadn’t seen it since until today at school, but I still remembered every detail so clearly.

In this sequence, the Emperor of Qin (in ancient China) is ordering an execution of a nameless warrior who had plotted to assassinated him. An archery is positioned at the entrance of the palace, prepared to fire as soon as the Emperor gives his orders. The entire film is told from the perspective of the nameless warrior to the Emperor himself, with the warrior recounting the events that happened when he and three others planned the assassination. The Emperor, a cold and cruel man, comes to respect this warrior throughout the story and reluctantly orders the execution when urged by his court. 

I could not recommend this film more, especially if you appreciate some damn fine cinematography.

Robert Adams

"Robert Adam’s pictures are not easy to decipher, but demand intense contemplation. The more one studies them, the clearer the various details become, including the interplay between shapes and natural forces. Even if Adams’ pictures are of the American West and its distinctive nature, culture and landscape, his life’s work exists on a general scale, and is in fact, global. The pictures open our eyes to the landscape around us, regardless of where we are. Adams’ photographs bear witness to his sincere interest in and concern for the landscape that he has seen, and his ability to visualize and immortalize it."

Gunilla Knape, from the book Robert Adams: Tree Line (Hasselblad Award 2009)

Glances through windows,
through images

"The windows are the first to go. They remain as a frame only, a focus, an iris. Once a child looked out of that window, past the lace curtains, across the lawn and into the field, through the hot sun. The family who looked from this window looked across the land before it and into the sky and beyond, a land that couldn’t be seen, across a distance, and now these people are gone. The windows, and then the door, are open now to a passage, and, indeed, the outside has come in. The skin of the house has been broken."

by Anthony Bannon

Photographs by Roger Eberhard, from his series Wilted Country